Child Sexual Abuse

SathSath works to protect male youth from sexual abuse and exploitation, and to disengage as many male youth as possible from commercial sex work.

We use an alternative livelihood model to realize target beneficiaries’ social and economic rights. Economically, we support target beneficiaries in achieving educational and vocational needs, assisting them to create a sustainable livelihood. Socially, we address their needs for social integration and help develop skills necessary to access opportunity and resources.

SathSath has primarily worked to prevent the sexual abuse and exploitation of boys. Our Nepali society assumes and believes that it is only girls who are subjected to sexual abuse. Thus, we find it imperative to educate the public and advocate for these boys. Boys also experience sexual abuse and exploitation, not only girls.

We as a society lack awareness of this issue and our ignorance limits our ability to protect children. While sex and the idea of children engaging in sexual activities are considered taboo, people do sexually exploit and abuse children. The topic remains largely unrecognized and, with it hidden from public view, the current approach allows people who exploit and abuse children to continue to do so without repercussion.

Confronting the injustice is a complex, sensitive, and challenging undertaking which involves an array of practical and ethical considerations.

To date in Nepal, there has not been a proper and thorough study on the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC). We do not know how many children in Nepal are involved in the adult entertainment sector.

No matter girl, boy, or third gender, survivors of sexual abuse and exploitation experience mental and physical pain.

Society rejects the possibility that males can be abused, but this denial does not mean it does not happen. Believing young males can be abused—whether by representatives of the state, society, family, guardians, or educational system—means preventing abuse in the future.

Parents and guardians may forget and can neglect that it is also their responsibility to protect their children, including their sons. Often, cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of boys are ignored and buried out of mind.

This booklet is a contribution to the global #MeToo movement. In it, we present true stories in attempt to foster awareness about this issue in Nepal.

Biso Bajracharya
Executive Director
SathSath